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U.S. Army, flag
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U.S. Army, flag

The Flag of the United States Army displays a blue replica of the official seal of the Department of the Army set on a white field. Beneath the seal is a broad scarlet scroll bearing the inscription in white letters, United States Army. Beneath the scroll, in blue Arabic numerals, is 1775 the year in which the Army was created with the appointment of General George Washington as Commander-in-Chief. All of this in on a white background.

The flag was officially adopted by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, on June 12, 1956, with Executive Order 10670.


U.S. Army, Star Logo
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U.S. Army, Star Logo

U.S. Army Star Logo Patch: On a foliage green embroidered rectangular device rounded on the corners 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in width and 3 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) in height overall, the U.S. Army Star Logo with the inner and outer star, two rectangular outlines and “U.S. ARMY” in black, all else is foliage green; all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) foliage green border.

Symbolism: The Army of One is about both the individual soldier and the collective strength of the Army. It represents the soldiers’ pride in making a difference for themselves, their families, and the nation.

Background: The Chief of Staff, Army, approved the wear of the patch on the ACU by personnel assigned to Headquarters Department of the Army (officer and enlisted personnel assigned to the Army Staff only), U.S. Army Accessions Command (USAAC), U.S. Army Accessions Support Brigade, Initial Entry Training (IET), and One Station Unit Training (OSUT). The patch may be worn on the ACU only. For all other classes of uniforms, soldiers will wear the shoulder sleeve insignia currently prescribed by AR 670-1. The patch was authorized on 16 June 2006. It was amended to further clarify the wear policy by personnel assigned to HQDA on 21 August 2006. The insignia was amended to extend (authorize) wear by the Army Recruiting Command's leaders and recruiters on 25 July 2007. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-887)

/ TIOH

U.S. Department of the Army, seal
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U.S. Department of the Army, seal

In the center is a Roman cuirass below a vertical unsheathed sword, point up, the pommel resting on the neck opening of the cuirass and a Phrygian cap supported on the sword point, all between, on the right an esponton and, on the left a musket with fixed bayonet crossed in saltire behind the cuirass and passing under the sword guard. To the right of the cuirass and esponton is a flag of unidentified designs with cords and tassels, on a flagstaff with spearhead, above a cannon barrel, the muzzle end slanting upward behind the cuirass, in front of the drum, with two drumsticks and the fly end of the flag draped over the drumhead; below, but partly in front of the cannon barrel, is a pile of three cannon balls. To the left of the cuirass and musket is a national color of the Revolutionary War period, with cords and tassels, on a flagstaff with spearhead, similarly arranged above a mortar on a carriage, the mortar facing inward and in front of the lower portion of the color and obscuring the lower part of it; below the mortar are two bomb shells placed side by side. Centered above the Phrygian cap is a rattlesnake holding in its mouth a scroll inscribed "This We'll Defend." Centered below the cuirass are the Roman numerals "MDCCLXXVIII."

Symbolism: The central element, the Roman cuirass, is a symbol of strength and defense. The sword, esponton (a type of half-pike formerly used by subordinate officers), musket, bayonet, cannon, cannon balls, mortar, and mortar bombs are representative of Army implements. The drum and drumsticks are symbols of public notification of the Army's purpose and intent to serve the nation and its people. The Phrygian cap (often called the Cap of Liberty) supported on the point of an unsheathed sword and the motto, "This We'll Defend," on a scroll held by the rattlesnake is a symbol depicted on some American colonial flags and signifies the Army's constant readiness to defend and preserve the United States.

The traditional seal used during and since the Revolution was redesignated as the Seal of the Department of the Army by the National Security Act of 1947. The Department of the Army seal is authorized by Section 3011, Title 10, United States Code. The date "MDCCLXXVIII" and the designation "War Office" are indicative of the origin of the seal. The date (1778) refers to the year of its adoption. The term "War Office" used during the Revolution, and for many years afterward, was associated with the Headquarters of the Army.

/ TIOH

U.S. Secretary of the Army, flag
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U.S. Secretary of the Army, flag

U.S. Army National Guard, seal
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U.S. Army National Guard, seal

Description: Centered on a light blue disc edged red, a representation of the Minute Man Statute by Daniel French in bronze detailed black facing to the right, all enclosed by a blue border bearing the words ARMY NATIONAL GUARD at the top and five stars below all in white.

Background: The device was authorized by NGR 750-58 for use in marking material. It was authorized as the seal for the Army National Guard on 28 August 1989.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Reserve, seal
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U.S. Army Reserve, seal

On a dark blue disk the bust of a Minuteman in cocked hat on a pedestal, between two branches of olive Or within a dark blue designation band with gold inner and outer border inscribed UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE in gold.

Symbolism: The minuteman has traditional been used to represent the citizen soldier. The wreath signifies achievement and accomplishment. Gold is symbolic of honor and excellence and dark blue signifies loyalty.

The emblem was approved for use as a plaque in 1972 and is used as an unofficial identification device of the United States Army Reserve.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Retired, flag
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U.S. Army Retired, flag

U.S. Army, emblem of Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army U.S. Army, emblem of Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army

On a blue disc a device consisting of a coat of arms blazoned as follows: Argent, an officer's saber and as sword saltirewise, points up Proper, and thereon an inescutcheon of the shield of the United States fimbriated Or all below a crest consisting of a bald American Eagle Proper perched upon a gold fasces binding a spear and twin cannon of the first as supported and below the shield a red designation scroll edged gold interlacing the cannon bases and inscribed 1789-1989 in gold numbers, the whole encircled by a white scroll, edged gold with the inscription in black letters "ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO THE SECRETARY OF THE ARMY" and in base intertwining sprigs of laurel and oak Proper.

Symbolism: Red, white and blue are our National color; the shield represents the Army and a strong defense. The antique cannon and swords represent the function of support and custodianship fulfilled by the Administrative Assistant's office. The eagle and inescutcheon symbolize the United States; the fasces denotes authority. The sprigs of laurel and oak represent achievement and strength. The scroll displays the dates "1789-1989" commemorating the bicentennial of the Office of the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army.

The emblem was approved by the Administrative Assistant's office on 24 Aug 1989.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Cyber Command (ARCYBER), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Cyber Command (ARCYBER), shoulder sleeve insignia

The shoulder sleeve insignia symbolizes the organization's missions. The green pentagon border represents ARFORCYBER's role as a land-based organization, while the inner white border signifies the containment of the threats against the cyberspace infrastructure. The design's black background represents the darkness of space, the unit's area of operations. The web or mesh design which surrounds the globe symbolizes "the shifting electronic energy of the cyberspace environment." The terrestrial globe has two meanings. First it indicates the global electronic reach of ARFORCYBER. Second, the division of the globe from light to dark signifies ARFORCYBER's 24/7/365 op tempo and the interaction of its cyber responsibilities. Three spears, at the forefront of the design, represent the three specific missions of computer network operations - attack, defend and exploit. The lightning bolt which crosses these spears illustrates the ability and swiftness to strike anywhere.

/ DOD

U.S. Army Inspector General, branch insignia
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U.S. Army Inspector General, branch insignia

A sword and fasces 3/4 inch in height, crossed and wreathed in gold color metal with the inscription "DROIT ET AVANT" (Right and Forward) in blue enamel on the upper part of the wreath.

On 26 February 1890, the Inspector General's insignia was approved by the Secretary of War. It consists of a crossed sword and fasces, with wreath. The fasces, composed of an axe in a bundle of rods, was a symbol of authority of Roman magistrates.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Inspector General, branch plaque
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U.S. Army Inspector General, branch plaque

The plaque design has the Inspector General insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The motto lettering and background are dark blue.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army, enlisted rank insignia
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U.S. Army, enlisted rank insignia

U.S. Army, officer and warrant officer rank insignia
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U.S. Army, officer and warrant officer rank insignia

U.S. Department of the Army, seal of the Senior Executive Service U.S. Department of the Army, seal of the Senior Executive Service

U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to Secretary of the Army
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U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to Secretary of the Army

A red shield surmounted by the Coat of Arms of the United States in gold between four white enameled stars, supporting a gold eagle displayed, wings inverted, 1 1/4 inch height overall.

The insignia for aides to the Secretary of the Army was prescribed in Army Regulations of 1948.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to Under Secretary of the Army U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to Under Secretary of the Army

A white shield surmounted by the Coat of Arms of the United States in gold between four red enameled stars, supporting a gold eagle displayed, wings inverted, 1 1/4 inch height overall.

The insignia for aides to the Under Secretary of the Army was approved in 1962.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Reserve Careers Division (ARCD), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Reserve Careers Division (ARCD), shoulder sleeve insignia

On an oval embroidered item, at base a pair of yellow elevated wings with scarlet details, surmounted by a yellow Roman cuirass, overall in the center a sword, point up, with a black hilt, pommel and hand guard, with a white blade, dark blue stripe in the middle, surmounted on the hand guard a yellow star bearing a white star outlined black; all within a yellow border. Overall dimensions are 3 1/4 inches (8.26 cm) in height and 2 3/4 inches (6.99 cm) in width.

Symbolism: The oval shaped insignia alludes to the continuous cycle of support to all Soldiers. The gold wings with the red details indicate the bloodshed by the Soldiers in the defense of the nation’s freedom. The Roman cuirass denotes security. The sword symbolizes military preparedness. The detail in the middle of the blade illustrates the Twin Towers, signifying the attacks that transformed the Army Reserve to an operational force widely used in the Global War on Terrorism. The star placed at the base represents ground zero. It serves to remind us that the foundation of the Army Reserve strength is built upon its Citizen Warriors.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 September 2009. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-1013)

/ TIOH

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